Monday, April 14, 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - #14 Sarah Adams

Sarah Adams, my paternal second great grandmother, was born on January 15, 1829, in Sumter County, Georgia. Her parents were Lucy Ivey and Rowell Adams, and her siblings were George, Mary (b. 1825), Celia (b. 1838), Henry (b. 1840), and Lucy (b. 1843).

Sarah married my second great grandfather William Jackson Brown in 1847 in Sumter County. She gave birth to ten children: Thomas Jefferson (1847-1923), William Franklin (b. 1849), Elizabeth (b. 1851), James Andrew (b. 1852), Mary (b. 1855), Sarah Cecille (b. 1858), John Berry (1863-1930), Henry Washington (1863-1933, my great grandfather), Willis Jackson (1864-1941), and Robert Joseph (b. 1867). The online Georgia digital marriage records is missing the books that would have their marriage record.

By the time of the 1860 census, Sarah and her family, her parents, and her sister Mary and brother-in-law William Hardin had moved to Covington County, Alabama. On their farm, Sarah and William grew wheat, corn, rice, tobacco, cotton, peas, and barley. They had at least one horse, some cows, pigs, and "other cattle." They churned butter and made molasses from sugar cane. Sounds like they had a very busy farming operation going! They had a total of 120 acres at this time, with 40 acres of it improved. William received a patent for this land in 1861.

Sarah and William J. Brown's land is outlined in red (aerial from Google Earth and section and quadrangle lines from Earth Point, labels added)


The approximate location of Sarah and William J. Brown's land is outlined in red and was southeast of Andalusia, Alabama (aerial from Google Earth, labels added)

They were all still living in Alabama after the Civil War as of the 1866 Alabama state census. About a year after that census was taken, Sarah died on September 12, 1867. After her death, her parents Lucy and Rowell Adams moved back to Sumter County Georgia and were there at least by the 1870 census. Sarah's sister Lucy Ann is living with them. Next door to her parents is Sarah's sister Mary and brother-in-law William Hardin and their children. Sarah's husband William and their children stayed in Alabama.

I haven't discovered where Sarah is buried. William lived out the rest of his life as a widower.

Catherine

This post is part of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge by genealogist Amy Crow at No Story Too Small.



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Sources used:

1850 U. S. Census, Sumter County, Georgia, population schedule, District 27, dwelling 1046, family 1046, Rowell Adams, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 January 2014), citing NARA microfilm publication M432.

1860 U. S. census, Covington County, Alabama, nonpopulation schedule, p. 21, line 20, William J. Brown, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2014), citing NARA microfilm publication M279.

1866 Alabama State Census 1820-1866, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 January 2014), citing Alabama Archives and History microfilm publication M2004.0008-M2004.0012, M2004.0036-M2004.0050, and M2008.0124.

1870 U. S. Census, Sumter County, Georgia, population schedule, Militia District 993, dwelling 687, family 685, Rowell Adams, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 January 2014), citing NARA microfilm publication M593.

Bureau of Land Management, digital image, Patent 24186 for William J. Brown, dated September 10, 1861 (http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/ : accessed 24 August 2010).